vero-beach

Vero Beach is a jewel of the Treasure Coast with its abundant waterways, majestic oaks and cultural wealth. The county seat of River County, Vero Beach is located on the Atlantic coastline and the Indian River Lagoon or Intracoastal Waterway.

It is actually two towns — one on the mainland where the historical urban district is located and the other on the tropical barrier island. The two are separated by the Intracoastal Waterway.

The quiet seaside village has evolved into an elegant and very sophisticated community that has been called the “Florida Hamptons” and the “New Palm Beach” as it has become the playground of some of the wealthiest people in the world. It is the residential preference of more retired Fortune 500 CEOs than anywhere else.

John’s Island is the stately residential community of choice for wealthy seasonal visitors and year-round residents; Georgian architecture adorns condominiums, courtyard homes and estates ranging in price from $600,000 to over $14,000,000 in value. This elegant seaside village offers 3 championship golf courses, tennis club, oceanfront club, fine dining and nearby polo.

Vero Beach offers a wide diversity of other communities both on the island and on the mainland with a multitude of cultural and recreational opportunities

The tropical climate allows a large diversity in vegetation with colorful florals, ancient oak trees, palms and a western landscape of pine forests as depicted in Bean Backus paintings. The natural of Vero Beach captivates visitors and residents alike.

The pristine beaches along the Atlantic coastline offer sand, surf and breathtaking sunrises. Recreational opportunities include swimming, scuba diving, boating, fishing, surfing and other water sports. Beachgoers will find several great family parks with playgrounds for the children and pavilions for grilling, and picnics. Ocean front dining is plentiful with both indoor and outdoor choices for casual and fine dining.

Incorporated in 1919, the history of Vero Beach is as rich as its residents. Perhaps its most well-known pioneer was the eccentric Waldo Sexton, who, among other things, built the Historic Driftwood Inn, an oceanfront  and restaurant constructed in the early 20th Century entirely from pieces of driftwood and other antiques. There are numerous other attractions on the National Register of Historic Places.

Located at the northern end of the Treasure Coast, Vero Beach is 110 miles southeast of Orlando and 135 miles north of Miami. It consists of 13.1 square miles and has a population just a little over 17,000.

CNBC recently cited Vero Beach as the 2nd strongest real estate market in the country. Vero Beach’s appeal extends to its excellent public and private school system, as well as a strong economy and vibrant business and industry. The influx of research institutions is the face of the job market.